Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998

CJ's Part Number: BCK2
MSRP: $141.99
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Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998
Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998 Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998 Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998 Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998 Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998 Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998 Play Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998 Video 1 Play Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998 Video 2

Product Description

Set of Black Upper and Lower Rear Tubular Control Arms for all 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997 and 1998 Mustangs.

For the everyday casual driver, but the spirited driver needs something a bit more durable. This set of Black Upper and Lower Rear Tubular Control Arms for all 1979-1998 Mustangs are just what you need!

These replacement tubular control arms will fit directly in place and swap out the old factory stamped steel control arms in all 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997 and 1998 Mustangs. This control arms in this kit are constructed from brawny, reliable tubular steel. Thick and stout, these arms provide the support and firmness in the suspension you want, while the sleek, smooth black paint, adds a touch of flair and style to this upgrade.

This kit includes mounting hardware as well as new, upgraded polyurethane bushings that provide stiff, rigid support for a dramatically increased overall performance. These hard bushings and strong control arms will help reduce the wheel hop resulting from weaker arms bending. The reinforcement and augmented strength added by this kit will improve your Mustang's launches and heighten the control and precision of handling and maneuvering.

Don't be content to settle with the stock control arms that tend to deflect, flex and bow during feisty, vigorous driving. CJ Pony Parts has hundreds of suspension parts for your Mustang so you can make the necessary upgrades to feel confident, safe and smart, when you really lay into her and push your pony to the extreme!

Similar Mustang Parts

similar Mustang parts More Rear Control Arms  

Installation Instructions

Mustang Installation

Mustang Applications

This product will fit the following Ford Mustang years:

Product Reviews

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Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998 is rated 3.5 out of 5 by 2.
Rated 2 out of 5 by from The arms really are good quality, but... These arms are great, nice quality. The hardware is the issue. First of all it, sure would make more sense to put a standard grease fitting in them that attaches to every cheap grease gun out there instead of needing a different/special tip. Second, the bolts are wrong/inferior grade. Stock bolts are hardened 10.9 grade bolts with coinciding nuts. These arms come with a weaker 8.8 with what appear to be only 5.8 grade nuts. The very first one stripped its threads right off long before reaching factory torque spec. Causing an extra hour to be wasted trying to pry the nut back off..
Date published: 2016-04-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Upper and lower control arms Exelent product. ..................................
Date published: 2015-07-26
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Product Questions

Will they fit a 2000 mustang with a V6?

Asked by: jeffafroco
No, they will not
Answered by: Rick CJs
Date published: 2016-08-09

What kind of grease should the bushings be greased with?  I've read about someone using the wrong grease and destroying the bushings.  How often should they be greased?

Asked by: Bob GT
CAB28 is the replacement bushings
Answered by: tom cjpp
Date published: 2016-02-03

Will tubular control arm kit stop wheel hop?

Asked by: 82 gt
It may not completely stop it but it will help.
Answered by: rk cjpp
Date published: 2015-12-09

Will this kit fit a 2004 mustang. .

Asked by: steve24
No, it won't fit.
Answered by: CJ Pony Parts
Date published: 2015-05-08

are there replacement bushings (12) available in kit form for these arms, 

Asked by: trevor 146
Something like this? http://www.cjponyparts.com/replacement-rear-control-arm-bushing-kit-1979-1998/p/CAB28/
Answered by: CJ Pony Parts
Date published: 2015-09-08

I have a 1998 Mustang Cobra SVT and would like stock replacement trailing arms and control arms with the bushings. Which is the correct part for the Cobra?

Asked by: craigccs3
This one will fit.
Answered by: CJ Pony Parts
Date published: 2015-01-19

Can the factory quad-shocks be eliminated with these installed?

Asked by: MattS156
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Product Video

Rear Tubular Control Arm Kit Black 1979-1998 Video Transcript
By Bill Tumas: There's a lot of stock components on the Fox Body Mustang that can barely handle the factory horse power output and one of them is going to be the factory control arms. The stamped steel arms and the rubber bushings can barely handle the 225 horse these cars make stock and as you add power, they're only going to get worse. Our '92 GT is mildly modified but it makes a little more horse power than stock and the factory arms have over 90,000 miles on them. Today we're going to upgrade to these tubular control arms for both the upper and lower.

The upper lower control arm's job is to keep the rear centered and planted during acceleration. These arms here are going to be what I would consider one step up from your stock arm, an excellent replacement for a mild car like a weekend cruiser. They're going to be tubulars, so they'll be a lot stronger than the stamped steel and that polyurethane bushings will do much better than the rubber. The kit's going to include two lower arms, two upper arms and necessary hardware for installation.

For this installation, get a lift and a pull jack or a jack and jack stands, a 3/8 ratchet, 10mm socket, 13mm socket, 18mm socket, 19mm socket, extension, 18mm wrench, 19mm wrench, small hammer and a pry bar.

The first thing you want to do for the installation is get the car up in the air. We're going to remove the sway bar itself from the lower control arms. I can't stress this enough, you only want to do one control arm at a time. You definitely don't want to do two. It makes it a lot harder to get the rear lined up. Once we do this, we'll support the control arm and we'll start with the lowers. Our new guy Freddie's going to handle the installation and I'm going to walk you through it.

In our case, we do have an aftermarket sway bar with different hardware. If you have a factory sway bar, you're just going to have bolts on the outside with inserts on the bar itself.

Now we're going to support the control arm. We're going to start by removing the rear bolt, then we can lower the control arm and lower the spring as well.

Now we're going to lower the control arm down and remove the spring.

Now with the spring out, there's no pressure. We can move up front and remove the front bolt. Now removing the front bolt, depending on your car, sometimes the muffler might be really close to the frame. You may have to remove the muffler to get the these bolts.

Old springs out, it's a good time to take a look at your spring isolators, ours are obviously brand new, but if they're worn out, it's a perfect time to replace them. Now we're ready to install our new lower arms. Before we install them, just put a little grease on the surface of the bushing, makes it easier to go in, plus it'll protect the bushing.

What we'll do now is just get the bolts hand-tight for the front, then we'll put everything back together. We actually don't want to tighten everything all the way up yet. We'll do that later.

With the leaf spring up into place, and again, make sure the edge, the bottom coil of the spring, is facing towards the back of the car.

This is going to be pretty common, it's going to be off like this. And again, why I'm saying to do one at a time, it's much easier to try to get one hole lined up then get them all lined up. All you'll do here, put a pry bar and lift, and just kind of move the rear into position.

Now we're going to tighten up the front bolt. The rear bolt we actually won't tighten until the car is back on the ground so it doesn't bind up.

With the lower done, now we can move on to the upper. We're going support the rear, basically just to hold it in place, then start breaking the bolts free.

Sometimes the upper bolt can be tough to get off. What we're going to do now is just take off the lower bolt, that way the arm will be loose and it will make it easier to get the bolts out.

All right, now we can remove our upper control arm.

After putting a little bit of grease on the new and the original bushing on the differential, we're ready to install the upper arm.

We're going to use the new hardware provided by the manufacturer. Sometimes with these, you might want to move the jack to the differential center as opposed to the axle, whatever you got to do to basically make it line up and put it back together.

All right, now we're going to repeat the process on the other side. Okay, with all four control arms mounted, now we can put the sway bar back in to place. It can go on the outside of the control arms.

Once all four are on, we can tighten them down. Depending on what sway bar you're running, you want to take a look at the hardware you're using. In our case, we went to put the nuts on with the lock washers, we noticed the hole was almost the size of it, so we're going to put some extra washers on there just for safety.

Now, we'll get the car back on the ground, get weight on the rear tires. Then we'll come up, tighten these bolts down, and your installation's finished.

Our tubular control arm set with the polyurethane bushings will do a great job of putting the power to the ground on our 1992 Mustang GT. As Freddie showed you, the installation's not too bad. It's a little bit time consuming, some of the bolts are kind of hard to get to, but give yourself two to three hours, and you'll be back on the road in no time.