What Is the Ski Country Special Ford Mustang?

By 1967, Mustang fever was in high gear throughout the country. The original Mustangs had sold over one million units in their first 18 months in production, and they inspired a whole generation of drivers by introducing the term “pony car” into the public consciousness. However, the sporty Mustang was still a tough sell in certain parts of the country, and Ford was eager to grow their sales in regional markets where performance had to take a backseat to practicality.

Ski Country Special MustangEnter the Ski Country Special

Not limited simply to Mustangs, the Ski Country Special package was dreamed up by Denver-area dealers and made available on a number of Ford’s sportier offerings, including the Galaxie, Fairlane and Country Sedan in addition to both hardtop and fastback Mustangs. The Ski Country Special package was only made available for the 1967 model year and only at ten dealers in the Denver area. Because of this, there is no official estimate as to how many were initially produced.

Features and Benefits

As opposed to the 1966 and 1967 High Country Mustangs — another Colorado exclusive — the Ski Country Special Mustang offered more than just cosmetic differences. In fact, the car was equipped with a number of useful features for winter driving, including snow tires, ski racks and an equa-lock rear axle. The Ski Country Special also included a luggage rack (called a “coffee bar” in promotional literature) and was available in five unique colors not available elsewhere — Aspen Red, Vail Blue, Winter Park Turquoise, Loveland Green and Breckenridge Yellow.

The Ski Country in Mustang History

As a regional variant limited to the Colorado area, the Ski Country Special Mustang ultimately did not have much of an impact on the greater history of the pony car. In fact, many have been sold without either party realizing there was anything special about the car aside from its unique badging.

Of course, Ford would go on to market many special-edition Mustangs over the years and, if for no other reason than it was one of the first, the Ski Country Special deserves mention in any overview of first-generation pony cars.