What Is a Playmate Pink Mustang?

The Playmate Pink Mustang — often mistakenly called “Playboy Pink” — was a special-order option available for first generation coupes and convertibles. To this day, a lot of misinformation surrounds the Playmate Pink Mustang, in part because of its rarity. Very few true Playmate Pinks survive, and those that do are highly prized by collectors and almost never come up for auction.

Playmate Pink MustangFact and Fiction

One persistent belief about the Playmate Pink Mustang is that the car was created as a gift for Playboy Playmates. While it is true that each year the magazine’s Playmate of Year was given a pink car, only in 1964 and 1969 was that car a Mustang. The 1964 car, given to Donna Michelle, was indeed a Playmate Pink, although the color was not a one-off and could be special-ordered by anyone. 1969’s winner, Connie Kreski, received a Shelby GT500, though whether or not it was a true Playmate Pink is not certain.

Beware of Pink Herrings

One of the main reasons why confirming a true Playmate Pink Mustang is so difficult is because, as a special order, there’s no official data available on the number produced. To add to that confusion, Ford offered no less than four separate pinks during the years 1964-1972, some of which were special orders, one of which — the 1967 Dusk Rose pink, paint code M0835 — was a standard color initially available on the 1957 Thunderbird.

What to Look for

The best way to authenticate a Playmate Pink Mustang is by ordering a Marti Report. Marti Auto Works holds the exclusive license to Ford’s production database from 1967 to 1993 and can tell you everything you need to know about a Mustang from that era, including where it was sold and whether or not it was a special-order color such as Playmate Pink. On a true Playmate Pink Mustang, the door VIN plate will be missing a paint code. Instead, there will be a DSO (District Sales Office) number, which indicates the car was special-ordered by the dealer.