5th Generation Ford F-100 Guide (1967-1972)

5th Generation Ford F-100 Guide (1967-1972)

Last Updated June 11, 2019 | C.J. Tragakis

Although the Ford F-100 lost some of its classic, curvy style in favor of a more squared-off and rigid look as it progressed through the generations, there’s no denying that it kept its essence and outlook on life. Which is to say, that it is a practical, reliable, “everything-you-need-and-nothing-you-don’t” truck that offered people from all walks of life a vehicle designed to simply get stuff done. In the last two decades, hardly anything revolutionary had been added to the foundation. If you were to blindfold a layperson and put them in both a 1952 and 1972 F-100, they’d be hard-pressed to tell the difference. However, a new trend was slowly but steadily gaining steam.

1970 Ford F100 Restored

1970 Ford F100 Restored Interior

As we’ll see below, Ford began adding more and more features to their pickups to make them more luxurious and car-like. While these changes were not unexpected and demonstrated a larger trend of light trucks being utilized not just solely for work, but also for daily driving and recreation. This is especially evident in Ford’s marketing from the time, with advertisements and brochures often focusing just as much on comfort as on utility. Slogans like “Works like a truck. Rides like a car.” and “Only a Ford pickup works like a truck, rides like a car.” were indicative of the branding that the company used at the time. While these models were still a far cry away from the massive, technology and luxury-packed pickup trucks of today, the winds were beginning to change towards that direction.

1970 Ford F100 Brochure Slogan

Check out our guide and specs for an overview of the different model years, colors, and features of the fifth generation Ford F-100 pickup truck. The graphic below provides a quick look at the front ends of each model year, which never used the same grille twice in a row!

5th Gen F100 Front Grille Comparison

1967 Ford F-100 Overview and Changes Versus 1966

The 1967 truck came in three trim levels: Standard Cab, Custom Cab, and Ranger. Each offered variations in style and comfort but could be configured with virtually the same engine, transmission, drive wheel, and bed options. This general format would be altered slightly in the coming model years, but the overall hierarchy was similar. Note that the Ranger name is another one that has survived the decades to remain in Ford’s current stable.

1968 Ford F100 Bed Options

Ford F-100 Transmission Diagram

Transmission offerings were much the same as they had been for years. You could select a “three-on-the-tree” column-mounted 3-speed manual, a 4-speed manual, or a 3-speed Cruise-O-Matic automatic. These were mated to one of two different inline six-cylinder engines or to Ford’s 352 cubic inch “Interceptor” V8, which produced a healthy 208 hp and 315 lb-ft of torque.

A heater, ashtray, two-speed windshield wipers, lap seatbelts, and latching glove box were standard equipment. Notable options included AM radio, power steering, power brakes, shoulder seatbelts, and SelectAire air conditioning. The Ranger package was now in its second year and offered bucket seats, carpeting, and an optional center console.

Compared to the last model year of the fourth generation, the 1967 F-100, the new truck offered improved cabin quietness thanks to better sound deadening. There was also more shoulder room, making for a better road trip experience. Ford even added padded sun visors, showing how small details could add up to a more pleasant experience inside the cabin. As noted, these steps to make their light pickup trucks more daily-driver-friendly was an important part of Ford’s strategy to keep up with consumer demands, as well as the competition.

Exterior paint colors for the 1967 Ford F-100 included:

  • Rangoon Red
  • Raven Black
  • Pebble Beige
  • Holly Green
  • Lunar Green
  • Frost Turquoise
  • Springtime Yellow
  • Harbor Blue
  • Wimbledon White
  • Pure White
  • Chrome Yellow

1968 Ford F-100 Changes

Per updated federal regulations in the United States, Ford added the newly-mandatory side marker reflectors. In the case of the F-100, they were integrated into the left and right hood emblems. The lower bedside panels received rear marker reflectors on either side.

1970 Ford F100 Side Marker

A bigger and more exciting change for buyers came in the form of two new engine options, with 360 ci and 390 ci V8 motors replacing the older 352 ci engine. A revised rear suspension offered a bit more comfort, plus more strength and support for heavy loads.

1968 Ford F100 V8 Engine Additions

Inside the cabin, the interior was revised with updated heater controls, superior air conditioning (still optional, of course), updated armrests, interior door handles, and window cranks. Upper trim molding for premium models was also changed.

Finally, the new Ford F-100 “Explorer Special” trim was released, a sort of luxury-focused truck that offered popular options at a discount, allegedly only available in the spring of each year. The Explorer Package could also be optioned on the Bronco and Ranchero 500. The trim was continued until 1986 for the F-series lineup. The “Explorer” nameplate has stuck through the ages, however, and continues to be used today on Ford’s mainstay crossover SUV.

1968 Ford F100 Explorer Special

Exterior paint colors for the 1968 Ford F-100 included:

  • Rangoon Red
  • Raven Black
  • Pebble Beige
  • Meadowlark Yellow
  • Holly Green
  • Lunar Green
  • Sky View Blue
  • Harbor Blue
  • Wimbledon White
  • Pure White
  • Chrome Yellow

1969 Ford F-100 Changes

The 1969 F-100 was exciting in that it offered three new special edition models, which Ford called “Job-Engineered”. Each offered a different package of popular options that were designed to appeal to specific applications, but could really work well for anybody needing a work truck.

1970 Ford F100 Special Editions

The Contractor Special featured heavy-duty springs, side boxes for the bed, dual swing lock mirrors, a rear step bumper, a lighting package, and an optional under-hood electric power pack. These add-ons made it more ideal for work sites and construction duties.

The Heavy Duty Special had a larger battery, more powerful alternator, heavy-duty springs, a rear step bumper, and a gauge pack. It was perfect for those looking to run electric accessories that needed a lot of juice, be that at a business or a campsite.

The Farm & Ranch Special offered the heavy-duty alternator and larger battery, plus the heavy-duty springs. There were also side moldings and sideboards for the bed. Unsurprisingly, it was intended to be used for agricultural work.

1969 Ford F-100 Interior Trims

Also, the 302 Windsor engine that had seen use in the Mustang was also added as an option for the F-100, midway through the model year. It generated 205 hp and 300 lb-ft of torque in this application.

Exterior paint colors for the 1969 Ford F-100 included:

  • Raven Black
  • Norway Green
  • New Lime
  • Boxwood Green
  • Candyapple Red
  • Royal Maroon
  • Pebble Beige
  • Cordova Copper
  • Empire Yellow
  • Lunar Green
  • Reef Aqua
  • Sky View Blue
  • Harbor Blue
  • Wimbledon White
  • Pure White
  • Chrome Yellow

1970 Ford F-100 Changes

Ford rearranged the trim line-up into four different levels: Custom, Sport Custom, Ranger, and the new line-topping Ranger XLT. Note that the XLT trim is yet another nameplate that has continued on to be used in present day. This flagship trim gave the 1970 F100 a downright luxurious interior (at least, for a truck), with wood-veneer inserts, full interior carpeting, and a sound-absorbing headliner.

1970 Ford F100 Ranger

1970 Ford F100 Brochure Ad

A mid-cycle update meant that the grille was entirely new, and the front fascia now featured wraparound turn indicators. The fuel tank size was increased from 18 gallons to 19.5 gallons.

Exterior paint colors for the 1970 Ford F-100 included:

  • Raven Black
  • Norway Green
  • New Lime
  • Boxwood Green
  • Candyapple Red
  • Royal Maroon
  • Mojave Tan
  • Yucatan Gold
  • Pinto Yellow
  • Diamond Blue
  • Reef Aqua
  • Sky View Blue
  • Harbor Blue
  • Wimbledon White
  • Pure White
  • Chrome Yellow

1971 Ford F-100 Changes

There was little to separate the 1971 model from the previous year, apart from minor trim changes. Ford didn’t go a single model year in this generation without changing the front grille in some way, and so the 1971 truck’s also got a minor revision. Federally-mandated exhaust emission systems and fuel vapor containment devices were added as well. With oil embargos and further emissions regulations on the horizon, these trends would continue with the upcoming sixth-generation F-series.

1968 Ford F-100 Camper
Back in the day, F-series trucks were also available as campers, right from the Ford dealership.

Exterior paint colors for the 1971 Ford F-100 included:

  • Raven Black
  • Mallard Green
  • Seafoam Green
  • Boxwood Green
  • Calypso Coral
  • Candyapple Red
  • Regis Red
  • Mojave Tan
  • Prairie Yellow
  • Diamond Blue
  • Swiss Aqua
  • Sky View Blue
  • Bahama Blue
  • Wimbledon White
  • Pure White
  • Chrome Yellow

1972 Ford F-100 Changes

As with the previous model year, there were few overall changes as the fifth generation came to a close. F-250 trucks with four-wheel drive received a more robust, 3,300-lb-rated Spicer front axle. A cold weather group (called the Northland Special package) was offered that included an engine block heater, bigger battery, beefed-up alternator, and a limited-slip rear axle.

1972 Ford F-250 in Blue
When equipped with 4WD, the 1972 F-250 received a beefed-up front axle.

Exterior paint colors for the 1972 Ford F-100 included:

  • Mallard Green
  • Seapine Green Metallic
  • Winter Green
  • Sequoia Brown Metallic
  • Calypso Coral
  • Candyapple Red
  • Royal Maroon
  • Prairie Yellow
  • Tampico Blue Metallic
  • Swiss Aqua
  • Wind Blue
  • Bahama Blue
  • Bay Roc Blue Metallic
  • Wimbledon White
  • Pure White
  • Chrome Yellow

Best 5th Gen Ford F-100

Unlike some of the other generations, there isn’t really a “best-of-the-litter” when it comes to the 1967-1972 trucks. It’s much more important to find an example that is in good shape, with matching numbers and minimal rust. On these classic vehicles, the easy-to-work-on nature means that even an engine swap is seen as common and no problem in terms of collectability. Enthusiasts are generally more concerned with the appearance and integrity of the exterior and are happy to accept a new motor or re-upholstered bench.

This generation of truck is an undeniable piece of Americana, and while they aren’t often featured prominently in media like a sports car might be, they’re a staple of period pieces that try to portray the U.S. during the Vietnam War era. Perhaps the most notable use of a 5th generation Ford pickup truck in film was in the 2007 movie No Country for Old Men. The protagonist Llewelyn Moss attempts to escape Anton Chigurh in a commandeered 1971 F-100 that gets some decent screen time.

Below is a specs table providing an overview of the first model year of the fifth generation, the 1967 F-100.

1967 Ford F-100 Specs
Spec1967 Ford F-100 Styleside
Starting MSRP $2,237 (approx. $17,300 adj for inflation to 2019)
Engines 240 ci I6, 300 ci I6, 352 ci V8
Horsepower 150 hp. 170 hp, 208 hp
Torque 234 lb-ft, 283 lb-ft, 315 lb-ft
Transmission 3-speed manual, 4-speed manual, 4-speed "Cruiseomatic" automatic
Base Curb Weight 3,460 lbs (short bed)/3,560 lbs (long bed)
Length 191.3 inches/211.3 inches
Wheelbase 115.0 inches/131.0 inches
Bed Length 6.5 feet or 8 feet
Height 70.9 inches/70.6 inches
Width 79.4 inches
Fuel Tank Capacity 18 gallons
Wheel Size 15 inch (16 inch optional)

5th Generation Ford F-100 Parts

Whether you’re just starting a major restoration or simply looking to add some finishing touches to your build, CJ’s has a fantastic selection of parts and accessories for your classic Ford F-100. Find everything that you need to repair, revitalize, and perfect your vintage truck, from nuts and bolts to entire engine swap kits.

1968 Ford F-100 Long Bed

1970 Ford F100 Work Truck

1970 Ford F100 Trim Levels

1971 Ford F-100 Brochure

Image Credit: Ford | ClassicCars.com | Fordification | AutoWeek | RM Sotheby's | Car and Driver | Jalopnik | Truck Trend | Fuel Curve | Barrett-Jackson | Streetside Classics | Smoky Mountain Traders

Sources: Ford | LiveAbout.com | ItStillRuns.com | Fordification | BlueOvalTech.com | OldRide

5th Generation Ford F-100 Guide (1967-1972)

While many collectors will prefer the more streamlined looks of the earlier generations, the 1967-1972 Ford F-100 trucks are a piece of American history in their own right. Learn more about the revisions made throughout the years to the 5th gen F-series pickups.