What Does Mopar Mean?

What Does Mopar Mean?

Last Updated May 18, 2020 | C.J. Tragakis

If you've been around car shows or automotive enthusiasts, you may have heard the term “Mopar” thrown around. So what is Mopar? While the term has several connotations, the answer is pretty simple.

What Does Mopar Mean?

Mopar stands for “motor parts.” The name was first used in 1937 on a can of Chrysler antifreeze. Chrysler decided “Mopar” was an easy-to-remember name it could put on its products and has used it since.

Mopar Blue M LogoMopar's "Omega-M" logo has been used since 1964. The modern blue version debuted in 2002.

Today, Mopar is the umbrella name for Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Fiat, and Ram parts and equipment. Official OEM parts for these makes can be bought through the Mopar division.

Who Owns Mopar?

Mopar is a division of FCA US, also known as Chrysler. FCA US is a subsidiary of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA). They’re a global company that operates in more than 150 markets with over 500,000 different parts.

Where Is Mopar Headquartered?

Mopar is headquartered in Centerline, Michigan, an area of northern Detroit. It’s located about 22 miles southeast of FCA US headquarters in Auburn Hills, Michigan.

The Mopar Parts Depot opened in Centerline in 1953. While business operations are run out of this location, Mopar parts are manufactured across Michigan, the U.S., and the world.

What Products Does Mopar Make?

Mopar’s range of parts includes everything from replacement components to high-performance upgrades. They make parts for engines, drivetrains, exhaust systems, suspension systems, brakes, and HVAC systems. They also produce interior and exterior accessories like cargo totes, fuel doors, and hitch receivers.

Mopar Crate Engine

Mopar manufactures larger components, like crate engines, as well. One of their most popular is the “Hellephant,”, a 1,000 hp supercharged 426 Hemi motor. There’s even a Mopar Restoration line for those looking to restore classic cars.

What Are Mopar Performance Parts?

Mopar markets performance parts for muscle cars and Jeeps. Some of their specialized performance packages include Drag Paks and Performance Stage Kits.

The Challenger Drag Paks are a limited-run set of packages that can be bought piecemeal or as one kit. They include special graphics, plus drag-ready wheels, tires, brakes, rear axle, transmission, driveshaft, seats, and more. The Performance Stage Kits, called Scat Packs, are available in three levels. Stages 2 and 3 are not street-legal.

Unlike some automakers, FCA doesn’t have a separate performance division. For example, Ford has Ford Performance, Toyota has Toyota Racing Development (TRD), and GM has Chevrolet Performance. However, these are separate from the core parts of their OEM manufacturing. Despite their large catalog of non-performance parts, Mopar’s racing and muscle car history put them in the same conversation as other performance outfits.

What Is a Mopar Car?

In the 1960s, muscle car enthusiasts began using the name “Mopar” to describe their vehicles. The company’s focus on performance parts gave them clout on the street and the drag strip. While there are no set rules on what's considered a Mopar car, it’s usually a performance-oriented machine. For most, a Mopar car is a muscle car with a V8 engine. Think Dodge Challenger or Charger. However, the Chrysler 300 SRT-8 would also fall into this category.

What’s Next for Mopar?

Based on recent trends, the horsepower wars don’t seem to be slowing down. Expect more Mopar engines from the Hellcat and Demon lineage, pushing the boundaries even further. Plus, factory-produced Mopar rides like the special Mopar Ram Rebel could become more numerous. The rise of off-road-focused vehicles could leave room for a special edition Jeep. And of course, we’re likely to see hybrid and electric vehicles in greater focus as more automakers shift to that route.

Sources: Mopar | Mopar Insiders | Allpar | Turbinecar

What Does Mopar Mean?

Mopar is the auto parts and accessories wing of Fiat Chrysler. Learn about their name, history, and products here.